Wave-Particle Duality and Electromagnetic Radiation

Because Secondhand Energy is produced by matter, its maximum speed is the speed of light. The only particles that travel at the speed of light are infinitesimal. By theory, infinitesimal particles can scatter like light. Since infinitesimal particles travel in borderline speed between matter and Meether, they exist interchangeably as one or the other. For this reason, light exists as both waves and particles. This is also the case for electrons. If you mix a whole bunch of Secondhand Energy together, you can potentially create a signal that propagates faster than the speed of light. When this signal passes through an object, it will speed up the Set Meether of this object and thereby lowering its RM to below 100%. Then the Hutchison Effect can be observed.

Now let’s talk about electromagnetic radiation. The electron is derived from Secondhand Energy through ImMeether. We already know that electrons always travel at the speed of light, regardless of spin or direction. Thus, the energy levels of electrons approach that of Meether. In turn, responses from Meether to any changes brought by electric charges, including movement, are apparent. The responses of Meether stabilize the changes of electric charges so that the positive time can efficiently store pure energy. This response is magnetism.31 Since the speed of Meether is always greater than the speed of light, and thus electrons, there will always be an immediate Meether response to electrical changes.32

Let’s look at the subject from a quantum perspective. If we apply the left and right hand rules to two electrons, side by side, traveling in the same direction, we can agree that they will be attracted by magnetic force and come together. If the electrons travel past each other in opposite directions, the magnetic force will repel the two. This explains why electromagnetic waves will only transmit from a radio antenna above a certain frequency.  An electron trail travels up and down a radio antenna. When the trail reaches a high enough frequency, there will be electrons simultaneously traveling both upward and downward, especially at the tip of the antenna. The opposing paths of electrons will repel each other in the perpendicular direction. Thus, electromagnetic transmission occurs only above a certain frequency beginning at the tip of the antenna, along a plane perpendicular to it. If visualized from above, rings of electrons emit from the antenna at alternating concentrations with time. During a radio transmission, Meether responds by sandwiching the electron-plane with two layers of magnetic waves, thick at the points of high electron concentration, thin at low electron concentration, and broken at zero electron concentration. This is the wave-particle duality postulate. There is always a slight angle between transmitting electrons from an antenna. As they spread out over a distance, their magnetic fields will split every electron to fill in the space in between.  For example, take three adjacent electrons A, B, and C, from the ring of electron emission. As the three spread out, the magnetic forces around A and C, will pull apart B. Thus, as electrons travel away   from an antenna, they will double along the way many times until each particle is infinitesimally sized. A linear perspective of this subject would appear more natural.

We all understand that temperature is the result of molecular movement. A solid object at room temperature consists of rapidly vibrating molecules in all directions, as are their electrons. Thus, they will generate magnetic wave radiation. Because radiation results from random vibration, uniform or straight-line radiation is impossible.33 Thus, electrons traveling along the same axis generate magnetic waves that affect each other.

For electromagnetic waves, we already know that the higher its frequency, the higher its energy content. Likewise, the lower its frequency, the lower its energy. This energy is Secondhand Energy. In the Meether concept, we know that when matter is produced, Secondhand Energy emerges along with it.  We also know that matter first appears as an infinitesimal particle traveling at the speed of light. The kinetic energy of an infinitesimal particle at its earliest state is the purest and highest form of Secondhand Energy and has no electric charge. Then they gradually combine to form larger particles, slow down, cool down, and release this Secondhand Energy. The Secondhand Energy will eventually become ImMeether and electric charge. Such is the process of Secondhand Energy “cooling” as electric charge forms from 0% to 100%. Therefore, the lower the frequency of an electromagnetic wave, the lower its energy state, and the greater its inductance. Similarly, the higher its frequency, the higher its energy state, and the lower its inductance. This is why we have a high efficiency for low frequency electromagnetic wave application, e.g. telegrams, radios, TV, cell phones. Although the high frequency light waves are defined as electrically neutral photons, they in fact have electric charges­­ at minimal levels.

The electromagnetic radiation of matter is simply the particles within a body of matter pushing the energy of each other away and releasing from the body. As a matter of fact, this phenomenon occurs as soon as the first two infinitesimal particles unite, which is the progression of the universe in positive time.

     31 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenz%27s_law

     32 At this point, we can see the speed of magnetic reaction is over c. Refer to the follow link for more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philadelphia_Experiment

     33 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck%27s_constant

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